Inspiring Women in London’s Food Industry

It’s an exciting time to be a woman working in food. There has historically been a disjunction between the fact that women were the primary household cook, yet the food industry has always been dominated by men. Now, the tides are changing and women are making their mark whether it be in the kitchen, at the forefront of food media, bossing their business or redefining our relationship with food. As a predominantly female force, we all about fostering female talent, collaborating and celebrating women in the industry, so here are a few of our London favourites.

Chef to watch:

Ravneet Gill – Formerly of St John Bread and Wine, Rav is now taking the pastry world by storm, heading up the pastry section at Llewelyn’s Herne Hill, providing menu consultancy and bespoke cakes. Most recently she closed the show at Salon’s 5th birthday party as the only female chef asked to take part in a 5-course extravaganza showcasing the food from some of London’s top restaurants. Follow her Instagram @ravneeteats for the ultimate pastry porn.

Media mogul:

Hazel Wallace – Where do we start with Hazel; she’s a complete and utter superwoman, whose built her business, The Food Medic around her full-time job as a doctor. What started as a blog for her own personal advancement, The Food Medic has grown astronomically, educating people around the world on how to lead a stronger healthier lifestyle, and one, thankfully, that is actually achievable. @thefoodmedic

Bossing their business:

Maxine Thompson – Any women who has been subjected to wearing unflattering, elasticated drawstring trousers in the kitchen will want to kiss Maxine, the founder of Polka Pants – practical and stylish chef trousers for women.  In an industry which has for too long prized the qualities of masculinity, we rejoice in a functional pair of trousers made by women for women, that celebrate the strength in femininity. @polkapants_

Raising our awareness:

Ruby Tandoh – We became big fans of Ruby, former contestant of Bake Off when she spoke out about the dangers of clean eating for Vice, eloquently sharing an opinion that many of us thought but that none of us had been brave enough to talk about. She continues to challenge the industry to be more progressive, recently talking about the lack of mixed race and LGBT role models working within food. Her latest book Eat Up, pioneers positive self-image, exploring our relationship with food, sex and our bodies. She’s a role model we are fully on board with. @ruby.tandoh